G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

Shel Silverstein : “Talked my head off Worked my tail off Cried my eyes out Walked my feet off Sang my heart out So you see, There’s really not much left of me.” ~

Martin Amis: “Gogol is funny, Tolstoy in his merciless clarity is funny, and Dostoyevsky, funnily enough, is very funny indeed; moreover, the final generation of Russian literature, before it was destroyed by Lenin and Stalin, remained emphatically comic — Bunin, Bely, Bulgakov, Zamyatin. The novel is comic because life is comic (until the inevitable tragedy of the fifth act);...”

Werner Herzog: “We are surrounded by worn-out, banal, useless and exhausted images, limping and dragging themselves behind the rest of our cultural evolution.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Justin E.H. Smith: “One should of course take seriously serious efforts to improve society. But when these efforts fail, in whole or in part, it is only humor that offers redemption. So far, human expectations have always been strained, and have always come, give or take a bit, to nothing. In this respect reality itself has the form of a joke, and humor the force of truth.”

विलास सारंग: "… . . 1000 नंतर ज्या प्रकारची संस्कृती रुढ झाली , त्यामध्ये साधारणत्व विश्वात्मकता हे गुण प्राय: लुप्त झाले...आपली संस्कृती अकाली विश्वात्मक साधारणतेला मुकली आहे."

Sunday, August 06, 2017

Robert Mitchum@100

#RobertMitchumAt100

Today August 6 2017 is 100th birth anniversary Robert Mitchum

Roger Ebert:

"Robert Mitchum was said to be an impossible interview, but I loved to spend time with him, because he didn't give a damn. He would say whatever he felt like saying, interview or not, didn't care if he was quoted, and would talk to you again. That's one reason he became such a larger than-life character: He wasn't protected by hovering press agents and thirtysecond sound bites...

...A 11 week people have been asking me who I liked better Jimmy Stewart or Robert Mitchum. I wouldn't play the game. They were both one of a kind. Each had a style, a grace, a bearing, a voice, a face, a walk, that was unmistakable and irreplaceable. To be forced to choose between them simply because of the unhappy coincidence of their deaths is meaningless. Who would you choose: John Wayne, or Jimmy Cagney? Bette Davis, or Marilyn Monroe. See what I mean?

..."What was his best movie?" people have asked me. With Mitchum, I answered Night of the Hunter, 1955, or maybe Out of the Past, 1947..."

Luckily for me, I have seen both and Mr. Ebert is right, Mr. Mitchum is just outstanding in both. 

Indeed, since I watched these films in this century, I realized how every aspect of the best Hindi films was influenced by Hollywood films, especially film noir. 


One of the very best, with Jane GreerJacques Tourneur's 'Out of the Past'

courtesy: respective copyright holders

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