G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

W H Auden: "But in my arms till break of day / Let the living creature lie. / Mortal, guilty, but to me/ The entirely beautiful."

Will Self: “To attempt to write seriously is always, I feel, to fail – the disjunction between my beautifully sonorous, accurate and painfully affecting mental content, and the leaden, halting sentences on the page always seems a dreadful falling short. It is this failure – a ceaseless threnody keening through the writing mind – that dominates my working life, just as an overweening sense of not having loved with enough depth or recklessness or tenderness dominates my personal one.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Art Spiegelman: "You know words in a way are hitting you on the left side of your brain, music and visual arts hit on the right side of the brain, so the idea is to pummel you, to send you from left brain to right brain and back until you're as unbalanced as I am."

विलास सारंग: "संदर्भ कुठलेही असोत, संस्कृत, इंग्रजी, बुद्धिवादी, तांत्रिक, इतिहासाचे, खगोलशास्त्राचे, आधुनिक पदार्थविज्ञानाचे, शिवकालीन व पेशवाईतील बखरीचे, अगणित ज्ञानक्षेत्रांचे, अशा वैविध्यपूर्ण ज्ञानावर लेखन- विशेषत: कवितालेखन- उभं राहत."

Monday, August 02, 2010

Two Compositions from Stage: Waman Kendre, Michael Grandage

Waman Kendre (वामन केंद्रे) is supposed to be very good in the art of theatre direction.

I haven't seen anything by him yet for which I feel bad. But what the hell...I haven't still read even one line from Eknath's (एकनाथ) "Bhagwat" (भागवत) . So much to do, so little time...

Do I understand anything called theatre? I think not.

But I like compositions- "The spatial property resulting from the arrangement of parts in relation to each other and to the whole."

I felt moved by following composition from Kendre's play.


from Bhasa’s 'Madhyamavyayoga' (मध्यमव्यायोग) in Hindi, Kendre's first interpretation of a Sanskrit work


courtesy: The Asian Age July 23 2010

It's a great pity that I have neither read or seen a single full length play of great Bhasa who earlier appears on this blog here and there.

Kendre's 'Madhyam Vyayog' brought to my mind when I was last moved by a similar theatrical composition.

When I first saw it, I couldn't take my eyes off the following picture. Even today it shakes me. What are they going to do next?


This is from FRIEDRICH SCHILLER's German epic “Don Carlos” directed by Michael Grandage.

The Economist (Feb 17th 2005) did one of the most impressive art reviews I have read.

"Whatever you do, don't miss “Don Carlos”...“Don Carlos” was written two years before the French revolution, and the good men belong to that time. Carlos, the king's son, and his friend the Marquis of Posa favour humanity, liberty and freedom of speech. Posa almost persuades Phillip of the case for freedom. But, true to history, when the curtain falls, the good men have lost. The dramatic climax is the entrance of the real villain—the imposing, sinister figure of the Inquisitor, clothed in a cardinal's scarlet. When he instructs the king in his duty to God and the Roman Catholic church, Phillip does his bidding—but Schiller has made the case against tyranny. Mr Grandage declares that the message rings no less true, and is no less relevant, on Shaftesbury Avenue in 2005..."