G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

H. P. Lovecraft: "What a man does for pay is of little significance. What he is, as a sensitive instrument responsive to the world's beauty, is everything!"

Werner Herzog: “We are surrounded by worn-out, banal, useless and exhausted images, limping and dragging themselves behind the rest of our cultural evolution.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Chris Ware: "Being a cartoonist means you don’t consider yourself too fancy."

Justin E.H. Smith: “One should of course take seriously serious efforts to improve society. But when these efforts fail, in whole or in part, it is only humor that offers redemption. So far, human expectations have always been strained, and have always come, give or take a bit, to nothing. In this respect reality itself has the form of a joke, and humor the force of truth.”

विलास सारंग: "संदर्भ कुठलेही असोत, संस्कृत, इंग्रजी, बुद्धिवादी, तांत्रिक, इतिहासाचे, खगोलशास्त्राचे, आधुनिक पदार्थविज्ञानाचे, शिवकालीन पेशवाईतील बखरीचे, अगणित ज्ञानक्षेत्रांचे, अशा वैविध्यपूर्ण ज्ञानावर लेखन- विशेषत: कवितालेखन- उभं राहत."

Monday, May 14, 2007

I dumped The Economist

I have been The Economist’s subscriber since year 1999. I was hypnotized by it. Attraction once was almost Freudian. I had stored its every single issue since then. I thought throwing them away was like throwing away love letters.

And then trouble started. I am not sure with what. Final fall-out came with American invasion of Iraq. If you want to know the true character of the magazine, just read these two issues- the first and fifth anniversary of 9/11.

Andrew Sullivan has put it well: "It’s written in the kind of Oxbridge prose that rips felicitously into one ear and out the other, and it subtly flatters some Americans into feeling that they are sitting in on a combination of an English senior common room and a seminar at Davos."

There are many things right with today's Britain as there are many things wrong. PM Blair and The Economist belong to the latter. I have a theory about the magazine. It surely supported division of Bengal in 1905. They probably put photogenic Lord Curzon on its glossy cover.

So one day this May, I decided to sell its back issues to a raddi-wala.

I have some good news to report. Economist old issues after gathering some moss weigh a lot more than you think. Pay-off for me was handsome. Thank you, The Economist.

Artist : Richard Decker The New Yorker 1 March 1958