G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

H. P. Lovecraft: "What a man does for pay is of little significance. What he is, as a sensitive instrument responsive to the world's beauty, is everything!"

Martin Amis: “Gogol is funny, Tolstoy in his merciless clarity is funny, and Dostoyevsky, funnily enough, is very funny indeed; moreover, the final generation of Russian literature, before it was destroyed by Lenin and Stalin, remained emphatically comic — Bunin, Bely, Bulgakov, Zamyatin. The novel is comic because life is comic (until the inevitable tragedy of the fifth act);...”

Werner Herzog: “We are surrounded by worn-out, banal, useless and exhausted images, limping and dragging themselves behind the rest of our cultural evolution.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Justin E.H. Smith: “One should of course take seriously serious efforts to improve society. But when these efforts fail, in whole or in part, it is only humor that offers redemption. So far, human expectations have always been strained, and have always come, give or take a bit, to nothing. In this respect reality itself has the form of a joke, and humor the force of truth.”

विलास सारंग: "… . . 1000 नंतर ज्या प्रकारची संस्कृती रुढ झाली , त्यामध्ये साधारणत्व विश्वात्मकता हे गुण प्राय: लुप्त झाले...आपली संस्कृती अकाली विश्वात्मक साधारणतेला मुकली आहे."

Friday, March 30, 2007

Is Indian cricket going the hockey way?

There is a lot of talk on these lines in Indian media- Times of India 29 March 2007 by Bobilli Vijay Kumar, No less than Arun Nehru Asian Age March 30 2007.

Implicit in this is argument is: cricket CAME hockey way.

Did it? No.

Hockey has always been played by many Europeans nations since its debut in 1908 Olympics. India was at number one in the sport from 1928 to 1960- winning 30 games on the trot at Olympics while losing none, scoring 197 goals while taking only 8. After losing to Pakistan in 1960, India reclaimed the gold at Tokyo 1964. Even after 1964, Indian Hockey did quite well, claiming two Olympic bronze medals and World Cup in Malaysia. Its decline started with 1976 Montreal Olympics.

Cricket, on the other hand, was never played by more than handful nations. Even then India can boast of very few great results– 1971 series win against England in England (England had just beaten Australia in Australia), 1971 series win against WI in WI, 1983 World Cup and 1985 World Series victory in Australia. Out of these only the last two could be compared to Olympic gold.

Indian hockey is surely in wilderness today but it truly has a glorious past. I am not sure if the same can be said of Indian cricket.

Our cricketers are rich. Our cricket bodies and their bosses are richer. In our country, like Americans, we increasingly associate wealth with personal merit. Therefore, once the dust settles down on India’s world cup performance, we surely will find tons of merit in all our wealthy boys.