G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

W H Auden: "But in my arms till break of day / Let the living creature lie. / Mortal, guilty, but to me/ The entirely beautiful."

Will Self: “To attempt to write seriously is always, I feel, to fail – the disjunction between my beautifully sonorous, accurate and painfully affecting mental content, and the leaden, halting sentences on the page always seems a dreadful falling short. It is this failure – a ceaseless threnody keening through the writing mind – that dominates my working life, just as an overweening sense of not having loved with enough depth or recklessness or tenderness dominates my personal one.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Art Spiegelman: "You know words in a way are hitting you on the left side of your brain, music and visual arts hit on the right side of the brain, so the idea is to pummel you, to send you from left brain to right brain and back until you're as unbalanced as I am."

विलास सारंग: "संदर्भ कुठलेही असोत, संस्कृत, इंग्रजी, बुद्धिवादी, तांत्रिक, इतिहासाचे, खगोलशास्त्राचे, आधुनिक पदार्थविज्ञानाचे, शिवकालीन व पेशवाईतील बखरीचे, अगणित ज्ञानक्षेत्रांचे, अशा वैविध्यपूर्ण ज्ञानावर लेखन- विशेषत: कवितालेखन- उभं राहत."

Saturday, February 19, 2011

Is Forward Short Leg an Entry Level Position?

Saad Bin Jung:

"...Today when cricket is no longer the same cricket as was played by the likes of Don Bradman and Vijay Manjrekar, the bowlers need all the assistance possible.

Surely after reading this, you will accept that benefit of doubt to the batsman must be changed to benefit of doubt to the bowler..."
(The Asian Age, Feb 15 2011)

I am in desperate minority in today's middle-class India. I have zero interest in ODI Cricket world cup starting today. (Luckily at my home my wife doesn't much like cricket and my son is more fond of football and test cricket.)

This is such a far cry from 1983 where at IIT-Madras, I couldn't gather courage to watch final moments of India's famous victory over mighty WI on TV. I had to go out of common-room and stand on the balcony in front of my room, on the third floor of hostel BRAHMAPUTRA- (one of the best places I ever lived), waiting with bated breath, for the climax.

For me, Test Cricket becomes fascinating sport because of bouncers/ short-pitch bowling and forward short leg.

If you are not wearing protective equipment- and for most of part of cricket history you didn't- you could die facing the former or fielding at the latter.

Although the likes of legendary Eknath Solkar (एकनाथ सोलकर) and Brian Close made forward short leg their own piece of real estate, most times rookies are asked to field there.


The Wizard of Id, created by Brant Parker and Johnny Hart.

(open the picture in another browser window to enhance it.)