G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

H. P. Lovecraft: "What a man does for pay is of little significance. What he is, as a sensitive instrument responsive to the world's beauty, is everything!"

Martin Amis: “Gogol is funny, Tolstoy in his merciless clarity is funny, and Dostoyevsky, funnily enough, is very funny indeed; moreover, the final generation of Russian literature, before it was destroyed by Lenin and Stalin, remained emphatically comic — Bunin, Bely, Bulgakov, Zamyatin. The novel is comic because life is comic (until the inevitable tragedy of the fifth act);...”

Werner Herzog: “We are surrounded by worn-out, banal, useless and exhausted images, limping and dragging themselves behind the rest of our cultural evolution.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Justin E.H. Smith: “One should of course take seriously serious efforts to improve society. But when these efforts fail, in whole or in part, it is only humor that offers redemption. So far, human expectations have always been strained, and have always come, give or take a bit, to nothing. In this respect reality itself has the form of a joke, and humor the force of truth.”

विलास सारंग: "… . . 1000 नंतर ज्या प्रकारची संस्कृती रुढ झाली , त्यामध्ये साधारणत्व विश्वात्मकता हे गुण प्राय: लुप्त झाले...आपली संस्कृती अकाली विश्वात्मक साधारणतेला मुकली आहे."

Sunday, February 07, 2016

स्मरणरंजनाची मराठी गुऱ्हाळं ...The Nostalgia Factories



Nicholas Carr:

"Nostalgia is nothing new. It has been a refrain of art and literature at least since Homer set Odysseus on Calypso's island and had him yearn to turn back time."

Sathnam Sanghera :

“…this relentless nostalgia is unhealthy because it saps our age of character. Think of the Sixties and a host of strong images spring to mind: flower power, the Beatles, civil rights marches. Similarly vibrant images come to mind in relation to the Seventies — flares, unemptied bins, strikes — and the Eighties — braces, Filofaxes, Wham. But is there anything that can pinpoint the flavour of the Nineties and Noughties apart from the popularity of laminate flooring? The past is so massively a part of our present that it’s hard to define what the present is about.”


Which are reportedly most successful Marathi entertainers over the past year or so?

A feature film called  "Katyar Kaljat Ghusali" (कट्यार काळजात घुसली) based on the popular play of the same name, first staged in 1967 and another feature "Natasamrat: Asa Nat Hone Nahi" (नटसम्राट: असा नट होणे नाही) based on another popular play of the same name (नटसम्राट) first staged in 1970. 

Both the films don't reinterpret the almost 50-year old original plays but just re-present them.

I strongly believe  both the movies are towering examples of the zest of middle-class, urban, young and old  Marathi speaking people for nostalgia (स्मरणरंजन).

Loksatta (लोकसत्ता) dated January 24 2016 reported the books that had most demand during the Akhil Bhartiya Marathi Sahitya Sammelan (अखिल भारतीय मराठी साहित्य संमेलन) held in the same month

Four of the top five books were first published at least forty years ago.
 


 courtesy: the late Vilas Sarang (विलास सारंग), 'Sarjanshodh aani lihita lekhak' (सर्जनशोध आणि लिहिता लेखक), 2007



Artist:  Liana Finck, The New Yorker, November 2015
 

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