G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

H. P. Lovecraft: "What a man does for pay is of little significance. What he is, as a sensitive instrument responsive to the world's beauty, is everything!"

Martin Amis: “Gogol is funny, Tolstoy in his merciless clarity is funny, and Dostoyevsky, funnily enough, is very funny indeed; moreover, the final generation of Russian literature, before it was destroyed by Lenin and Stalin, remained emphatically comic — Bunin, Bely, Bulgakov, Zamyatin. The novel is comic because life is comic (until the inevitable tragedy of the fifth act);...”

Werner Herzog: “We are surrounded by worn-out, banal, useless and exhausted images, limping and dragging themselves behind the rest of our cultural evolution.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Justin E.H. Smith: “One should of course take seriously serious efforts to improve society. But when these efforts fail, in whole or in part, it is only humor that offers redemption. So far, human expectations have always been strained, and have always come, give or take a bit, to nothing. In this respect reality itself has the form of a joke, and humor the force of truth.”

विलास सारंग: "… . . 1000 नंतर ज्या प्रकारची संस्कृती रुढ झाली , त्यामध्ये साधारणत्व विश्वात्मकता हे गुण प्राय: लुप्त झाले...आपली संस्कृती अकाली विश्वात्मक साधारणतेला मुकली आहे."

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

Portraying Oneself More Suave and Debonair: Triple Self-Portrait

Today Feb 3 2015 is 121st Birth Anniversary of Norman Rockwell and 88th Birthday of equally great Vasant Sarwate (वसंत सरवटे)




I saw the above on FB page of The Hindu on June 10 2014.

I kept looking more at the background of Mr. Haasan.

The painting, whose artist I don't know,  is an imitation of  the late Norman Rockwell's "Triple Self-Portrait" from The Saturday Evening Post issue dated Feb 13 1960.


John Wilmerding writes of the painting:

"His well-known “Triple Self Portrait” (1970), incorporates details from works by Rembrandt, Dürer, Picasso and van Gogh. Rockwell knew his art history from books, museum visits and trips abroad. More than borrowing from the old masters, he was sensitive to the artifices of pure design and perception. We see this in his numerous scenes of figures looking at pictures and of compositions showing paintings within paintings."



"Rockwell pokes fun at himself in 1960’s “Triple Self-Portrait.” The Rockwell in the mirror has foggy glasses. Rockwell’s reasoning for that was so “I couldn’t actually see what I looked like—a homely, lanky fellow—and therefore, I could stretch the truth just a bit and paint myself looking more suave and debonair than I actually am.”
There are a lot of interesting details other than the debonair gent at the easel. A student of great artists, Rockwell had self-portraits of masters pinned to the upper right of his work. We see Durer, Rembrandt, Van Gogh, and a funky post-cubist Picasso, all of which Rockwell himself painted..."

courtesy:  The Saturday Evening Post

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