G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

H. P. Lovecraft: "What a man does for pay is of little significance. What he is, as a sensitive instrument responsive to the world's beauty, is everything!"

Martin Amis: “Gogol is funny, Tolstoy in his merciless clarity is funny, and Dostoyevsky, funnily enough, is very funny indeed; moreover, the final generation of Russian literature, before it was destroyed by Lenin and Stalin, remained emphatically comic — Bunin, Bely, Bulgakov, Zamyatin. The novel is comic because life is comic (until the inevitable tragedy of the fifth act);...”

Werner Herzog: “We are surrounded by worn-out, banal, useless and exhausted images, limping and dragging themselves behind the rest of our cultural evolution.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Justin E.H. Smith: “One should of course take seriously serious efforts to improve society. But when these efforts fail, in whole or in part, it is only humor that offers redemption. So far, human expectations have always been strained, and have always come, give or take a bit, to nothing. In this respect reality itself has the form of a joke, and humor the force of truth.”

विलास सारंग: "… . . 1000 नंतर ज्या प्रकारची संस्कृती रुढ झाली , त्यामध्ये साधारणत्व विश्वात्मकता हे गुण प्राय: लुप्त झाले...आपली संस्कृती अकाली विश्वात्मक साधारणतेला मुकली आहे."

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Kim Novak- Now and Then...धम्मपद



The Dhammapada (धम्मपद):


"Look at your body—

A painted puppet, a poor toy

Of jointed parts ready to collapse,

A diseased and suffering thing

With a head full of false imaginings." 

 (as quoted in 'The Conspiracy Against The Human Race / A Contrivance of Horror' , 2010 by Thomas Ligotti)


Lip Service' by Marianne LaFrance, WSJ, August 6 2011:

"...This is why, as Ms. LaFrance shows, Botox treatments smooth out feelings as well as wrinkles. When Botox is injected into the muscle that encircles the eyes to eliminate what Ms. LaFrance unfortunately calls "those awful crow's-feet wrinkles" (she of all people should refer to them as laugh lines!), it inhibits the muscles that convey delight, curiosity or irritation. Appropriately enough, it does not affect the fake smile..."



Whom the gods would destroy, they first make beautiful. Just look what they did to Kim Novak. Until Sunday night, most of the world thought of Novak primarily as the siren of Hitchcock’s iconic “Vertigo,” a famously stunning actress whose career peak happened nearly 60 years ago. Then she showed up at the Oscars, presenting the award for best animated feature with an admiring Matthew McConaughey. Her hair was a shoulder length tumble of blond, but it was her face that was the most surprising for a woman of her 81 years. Her eyes seemed pulled back, her lips seemed strangely inflated and her skin seemed at once unnaturally taut and puffy. If you were on Twitter on the time, you could almost hear the collective gasp...."

Now:


courtesy: AP and The Atlantic

Apparently, Ms. Novak,  the 81-year-old actor, struggled to speak at the Oscars on the morning (in India) of March 3 2014.

Even her smile, fake or genuine,  seems to be affected in the picture above.

Spencer Kornhaber wrote in The Atlantic:

 "...The talk seems to be a bunch of people arriving at the same joke about the 81-year-old Vertigo star thinking she'd arrived to present an award for "Frozen," because of the way her face looked. Donald Trump, speaking as he does for civilization's baser instincts, tweeted that "Kim should sue her plastic surgeon!’"..."

Then:



courtesy: The Golden Age of Hollywood

No comments: