G C Lichtenberg: “It is as if our languages were confounded: when we want a thought, they bring us a word; when we ask for a word, they give us a dash; and when we expect a dash, there comes a piece of bawdy.”

Shel Silverstein : “Talked my head off Worked my tail off Cried my eyes out Walked my feet off Sang my heart out So you see, There’s really not much left of me.” ~

Martin Amis: “Gogol is funny, Tolstoy in his merciless clarity is funny, and Dostoyevsky, funnily enough, is very funny indeed; moreover, the final generation of Russian literature, before it was destroyed by Lenin and Stalin, remained emphatically comic — Bunin, Bely, Bulgakov, Zamyatin. The novel is comic because life is comic (until the inevitable tragedy of the fifth act);...”

Werner Herzog: “We are surrounded by worn-out, banal, useless and exhausted images, limping and dragging themselves behind the rest of our cultural evolution.”

John Gray: "Unlike Schopenhauer, who lamented the human lot, Leopardi believed that the best response to life is laughter. What fascinated Schopenhauer, along with many later writers, was Leopardi’s insistence that illusion is necessary to human happiness."

Justin E.H. Smith: “One should of course take seriously serious efforts to improve society. But when these efforts fail, in whole or in part, it is only humor that offers redemption. So far, human expectations have always been strained, and have always come, give or take a bit, to nothing. In this respect reality itself has the form of a joke, and humor the force of truth.”

विलास सारंग: "… . . 1000 नंतर ज्या प्रकारची संस्कृती रुढ झाली , त्यामध्ये साधारणत्व विश्वात्मकता हे गुण प्राय: लुप्त झाले...आपली संस्कृती अकाली विश्वात्मक साधारणतेला मुकली आहे."

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Renuka Shahane & Archana Joglekar, Try Mirabai Not Positivity on Your Patients

Renuka Shahane (रेणुका शहाणे) is (was?) hosting a reality TV program in Marathi 'Yala Jeevan Aise Nav' (याला जीवन ऐसे नाव).

I saw its promos.

Ms. Shahane is famous for her smile. She in fact is the pioneer of its Indian-TV version. Remember 'Surabhi', the program she co-hosted on Doordarshan?

Today Ms. Shahane promotes positive thinking. She feels it is panacea. Whatever is your problem, she has the answer: "Be Positive".

The other day I briefly saw Archana Joglekar (अर्चना जोगळेकर) on Marathi TV. She too was talking about the power of positive thinking. She asked viewers to embrace 'positivity'.

I bet if you watch Marathi TV everyday, you will get a large dose of positive thinking, kind of Jamalgota for your mental constipation.

(See an earlier post on the subject here.)

I wish both the fine ladies read either 'Bright-sided /How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America' by Barbara Ehrenreich or Lucy Ellmann's review of it:

"...Positive types aren't just misled, they're mean...

...The pitiless message to the powerless from all these motivational speakers, megachurch preachers, self-help gurus and other assorted selfishness-sellers is that sad sacks get what they deserve.

Promoting the idea that happiness is within your grasp is in the interests of corporations trying to bamboozle an overworked and underpaid workforce...

...Informing the uneducated and unmedicated that their plight is all their own fault is followed up by instructions for making anything you desire – from a new TV screen to a trip to Mexico – "materialise" through mind control. The censorship of negative opinion combines perfectly with the American policy of each man for himself in the best of all possible worlds.

This is the philosophy that gave us the smart bomb, the space programme, sub-prime mortgages, plenty of psychopaths and Sarah Palin. Every dumb American idea we've all had to stomach and die for can be attributed to this devotion to fantasy and self-satisfaction...

...Americans aren't happy, they're just trained to look as if they are. It's fake orgasm on a grand scale, and we're almost deafened by the din..." (The Guardian, Saturday 9 January 2010)

During the interview in February 2010, Ms. Joglekar talked about how her mother- Asha Joglekar, a classical dancer herself,- once completely ignored whatever Archana and her students were doing in class and instead immersed herself in a book on/by Mirabai.

Wise choice. I am sure junior Ms. Joglekar didn't mind the snub because of her 'positivity'.

But the message I got from senior Ms. Joglekar: Mirabai helps even in dance.


Artist: Colin Wheeler, Spectator

5 comments:

mannab said...

Dear Aniruddha,
It is highly commendable that you could watch such shows on TV and draw our attention in your post with lucid style.How about Anil Awachat?
Mangesh Nabar

aniruddha g. kulkarni said...

Thanks Mangesh.

I don't really watch the shows but see either their promos or once in a while programs reviewing such programs on Marathi news channel.

I did not understand "How about Anil Awachat?".

aniruddha g. kulkarni said...

Dear Mr. Khandke,

Thanks for your interest in my blog.

You have commented on Christianity on this post.

I can't publish those views on my blog before I verify them first- hand and that may take a long time.

Your views also tend to digress from the main subject of my posts.

Take for instance your previous comments on Tipu.

My point was that if Marathas' aim, right or wrong I don't know, was to keep Brits away from India they shouldn't have aligned with Brits to defeat him.

I never said anything about quality of Tipu as a ruler.

Therefore, I can't publish your views on him as a ruler simply because that was not the subject of the post.

In any case, please read M V Dhond's intro to his book on Lavani to learn what respect many Maratha chieftains gave to Hindu shrines.

On Christianity, let me repeat what I said.

In about 2000 years only 2+% population of India is Christians. There is nothing in this figure to be paranoid about.

Sure, there were some personal tragedies in the process of conversion but the history is littered with them.

In any case I couldn't care less if it was 0.2%, 20% or even 200%. That percent very well could include me.

Read history of India before Islam established itself in India. You think it was less bloody?

Shahu Maharaj of Kolhapur- one of the tallest leaders India produced- used to call both Akbar and Shivaji-Maharaj-'Mahatma'.

If you choose to comment on my posts in future, and you are welcome to do so, please remember what I have said here.

Yogesh Jayant Khandke said...

You are right, the comments are not related to the subject, Renuka Shahane TV et al, matters not of my interest.


The problem is that there is no way to directly communicate with you except this window.

I am not going to argue on Dhond, Shahu, Shivaji, Akbar, Mahatmas, Hindu shrines, Tipu, British and their relative heights, Christianity and its degree of proliferation.

I however wish to share various comment moderation policies with you, I have collected them from a couple of blog sites.

1. The most valued comments are alternative perspectives.

2. Comments that attack another person’s motivation, intelligence, or character are bad because they degrade the quality of the discussion and discourage thoughtful comments by others. For some reason, human beings often are confident that they can discern the hidden motivation for another person doing or saying something. Trained psychiatrists and psychologists, however, do very poorly at this task, so what hope is there for a lay person?

3. The least valued comments are reviews of the posting, good or bad. The reader has just read the entire posting. He or she doesn’t need someone else’s opinion that “this was great” or “this was bad”.

4. A whole list here (this is a race related site)
Guidelines for Commenting
Comments that violate the following guidelines may be deleted.

1. Don’t make threats of violence, ever.

2. Don’t address people using racial slurs. And yes, that includes anti-white racial slurs or even belittling/condescending remarks like “white boy.”

3. Don’t make personal attacks. If you’re not smart enough to win an argument without resorting to calling someone fat, stupid, crazy, or whatever, maybe you should work on your rhetorical skills.

4. Don’t respond to trolls. If someone is clearly posting a comment with the intention of starting a fight, or posting completely wrong, racist pseudoscientific crap like “all white people are albinos, science proved it”, just ignore them.

5. In general, let’s stay away from long, drawn-out arguments and fights. Once a thread descends into point-by-point refutations and denials, it has (not always, but a lot of the time) turned to crap.

6. Let’s avoid oppression olympics please. I’m not saying it’s never something to be discussed, but generally speaking, bickering over who has it worse off, or who’s more racist, is really kind of useless.

7. Try not to speak in generalizations. Don’t attribute characteristics to entire ethnic or racial groups. Adding modifiers like “some” or talking specifically about your personal experiences help reduce the likelihood that you’re stereotyping entire communities.

8. Don’t respond to a post or comment by saying “why don’t you focus on some real issues like the war/starving children in Africa/police brutality/etc.”

9. Don’t respond to critiques about racism by telling the person making the critique that they’re just too sensitive, or they need to “get a life,” or that they need to stop playing the “race card.” We welcome disagreements here on Racialicious, but make an intelligent case for your point of view. Don’t just dismiss others’ views.

It is not everyday one finds a blog like yours, I wish you all the best.

aniruddha g. kulkarni said...

Thank you Mr. Khandke for your understanding, wishes, kind words and also sharing your wisdom on comments moderation policies.

However in that last respect, I follow my own counsel.

Yes, I want to use this window only for "intellectual" discussions.

Hope to see you soon here.